Race, ethnicity, religious affiliation, and education is associated with gay and bisexual men’s religious and spiritual participant and beliefs: results from the One Thousand Strong cohort. 

Summary:

A new study published by investigators from the CUNY School of Public Health’s Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH) and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene highlighted HIV outcomes improvements experienced by Care Coordination clients entering the program with psychosocial barriers such as unstable housing, lower mental health functioning, and hard drug use.

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the rates of spirituality, religiosity, religious coping, and religious service attendance in addition to the sociodemographic correlates of those factors in a U.S. national cohort of 1,071 racially and ethnically diverse HIV-negative gay and bisexual men.

METHOD: Descriptive statistics were used to assess levels of spirituality, religiosity, religious coping, and religious service attendance. Multivariable regressions were used to determine the associations between sociodemographic characteristics, religious affiliation, and race/ethnicity with four outcome variables: (1) spirituality, (2) religiosity, (3) religious coping, and (4) current religious service attendance.

RESULTS: Overall, participants endorsed low levels of spirituality, religiosity, and religious coping, as well as current religious service attendance. Education, religious affiliation, and race/ethnicity were associated with differences in endorsement of spirituality and religious beliefs and behaviors among gay and bisexual men. Men without a 4-year college education had significantly higher levels of religiosity and religious coping as well as higher odds of attending religious services than those with a 4-year college education. Gay and bisexual men who endorsed being religiously affiliated had higher levels of spirituality, religiosity, and religious coping as well as higher odds of religious service attendance than those who endorsed being atheist/agnostic. White men had significantly lower levels of spirituality, religiosity, and religious coping compared to Black men. Latino men also endorsed using religious coping significantly less than Black men.

CONCLUSIONS: The implications of these findings for future research and psychological interventions with gay and bisexual men are discussed.

 

Citation: Lassiter, J. M., Saleh. L., Starks, T. J., Grov, C., Ventuneac, A., & Parsons, J. T. Race, ethnicity, religious affiliation, and education is associated with gay and bisexual men’s religious and spiritual participant and beliefs: results from the One Thousand Strong cohort. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. Link to PubMed >>

 

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