Events

  • Wed
    07
    Feb
    2018
    4pm-5:30pm55 W 125th Street, 7th Floor Auditorium

    Dr. S. V. Subramanian

    Professor of Population Health and Geography

    S (“Subu”) V Subramanian is a Professor of Population Health and Geography at Harvard University, and Director of a University-wide Initiative on Applied Quantitative Methods in Social Sciences. He was also the Founding Director of Graduate Studies for the interdisciplinary PhD program in Population Health Sciences. He received his under- and post-graduate training at the University of Delhi, and completed his PhD in geography from the University of Portsmouth, UK.

    Working in collaborations with scholars across the world, he has published over 500 articles, book chapters, and books in the field of social and contextual determinants of health, health inequalities in India, and applied multilevel statistical models. He has been named among Highly Cited Researchers (top 1% of cited publications in Web of Science) in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

    His current research interests include exploring the role of individual heterogeneity in population health narratives, the reciprocal association between neighborhoods and health; and understanding the causes and consequences of undernutrition and development among children in disadvantaged settings.

    As an educator, Subu was the first to develop a course on the concept and application of multilevel statistical methods at Harvard, which he has been successfully teaching at Harvard since 2001, as well as around the world. He has advised over 100 masters, doctoral and postdoctoral students as mentor, academic advisor and dissertation committee member. Subu is the Co-Editor-in-Chief for the international journal Social Science & Medicine (SSM), in addition to be being a Co-Senior Editor for the social epidemiology office of SSM. He is also the founding Co-Editor-in-Chief of a new journal SSM – Population Health. He is an editorial consultant to The Lancet, and an international advisory board member for the Lancet Global Health.

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  • Wed
    14
    Mar
    2018
    4pm-5:30pm55 W 125th Street, Room 708

    Implementation Research and Global Health: The experience of IDRC in reproductive, maternal, child, adolescent health and in health information systems

    Montasser’s 30 years of work experience started in Egypt as a graduate of Cairo University’s medical school. He is a holder of an MSc in Medical Anthropology from Brunel University, UK; and a Ph.D in Medical Anthropology from McGill University. Montasser is the Program Leader for the Maternal and Child Health team at Canada's International Development Research Centre. Before joining IDRC Montasser was the Deputy Director for Global Health Policy and Research at Global Affairs Canada. He also worked at the former Canadian International Development Agency CIDA as the Team Leader of the Health Specialists, and brings experience as a Reproductive Health Policy Advisor and as Manager of Multilateral Health Institutions and Partnerships. Between 2007-2014 he work at the Regional Office of the Ford Foundation in Cairo where he was a Senior Program Officer for Reproductive Health and HIV/AIDS in part supporting implementation research. Montasser's areas of interest and expertise include implementation research, sexual and reproductive health and rights, health systems strengthening, promoting greater government accountability, and knowledge generation and dissemination.

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  • Tue
    20
    Mar
    2018
    1pm-2pm55 W 125th Street, Room 717

    Promoting Health Equity in the Americas: One Community at a Time

    The ISPH along with the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy will host on March 20th, 2018 in room 717 from 1:00pm – 2:00pm Associate Professor of Global Public Health and Project Director for the UMASS Center for Digital Health, at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell. Dr. Maria Julia Brunette will deliver a talk on “Promoting Health Equity in the Americas: One Community at a Time.”

    In this presentation Dr. Brunette will discuss her experience implementing and sustaining community-based mechanisms to address global health disparities. Her recent research endeavors will be illustrated by three case studies related to the occupational health issues among migrant workers in the United States; the quality of working life of low-income industrial workers in Peru; and the strengthening of healthcare systems in a high-Tuberculosis burden area in the South.

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  • Wed
    21
    Mar
    2018
    4pm-5:30pmRoom 708

    Coordinator, Interdisciplinary Laboratory in Primary Heatlh Care (LIPAPS)
    Adjunct Professor, Medical Psychology (PSIMED)
    Coordinator for the Center of Mental Health, Polyclinic Piquet Carneiro (PPC)
    Rio de Janeiro State University (UERJ)

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  • Wed
    18
    Apr
    2018
    4pm-5:30pmRoom 708

    Inheritance & Health: What Really Matters for Health Equity? – Considering History, Jim Crow, and Racialized Economic Segregation

    Nancy Krieger, PhD

    Professor of Social Epidemiology
    Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

    What type of inheritance truly matters for the people’s health? This question gains new urgency as genomics and precision medicine take center stage in US biomedicine, taxes for corporations and the wealthy are slashed, regulations and programs to protect the environment and public health are undermined, and racism and coddling of white supremacy are evident at the highest levels of the US government. Guidance is perhaps surprisingly offered by the work of Wilhelm Johannsen, who in 1909 coined the terms “gene,” “genotype,” and “phenotype.” He was worried that biologists’ uncritical use of the term “inheritance” would become conflated with what he termed its “every day” meaning, i.e., “the `transmission’ of money or things, rights or duties – or even ideas and knowledge – from one person to another or to some others: the `heirs’ or `inheritors.’” Johannsen was right to worry. For public health, the decidedly non-biological type of inheritance is key – and is getting short shrift. As history shows, societal regulation and restriction of massive concentrations of private inheritance, along with promotion of public inheritance and support for shared and inclusive knowledge, is what best enables societies to improve population health and promote health equity. To underscore this point, empirical examples will be provided regarding: (1) the health impacts of spatial social and economic polarization on health, as quantified using the Index of Concentration at the Extremes, and (2) the beneficial impact of the abolition of Jim Crow, its embodied legacy in contemporary health inequities, and new initiatives tackling structural racism to promote equity, including health equity.

    Nancy Krieger is Professor of Social Epidemiology and American Cancer Society Clinical Research Professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH) and Director of the HSPH Interdisciplinary Concentration on Women, Gender, and Health. She is an internationally recognized social epidemiologist (PhD, Epidemiology, UC Berkeley, 1989), with a background in biochemistry, philosophy of science, and history of public health, plus 30+ years of activism involving social justice, science, and health. She is an ISI highly cited scientist (since 2004; reaffirmed: 2015), a group comprising “less than one-half of one percent of all publishing researchers.” Dr. Krieger’s work addresses: (1) conceptual frameworks to understand, analyze, and improve the people’s health, including the ecosocial theory of disease distribution she first proposed in 1994, concerned with embodiment and equity; (2) etiologic research on societal determinants of population health and health inequities; and (3) methodologic research on improving monitoring of health inequities.

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  • Tue
    24
    Apr
    2018
  • Wed
    02
    May
    2018
    4pm-5:30pmRoom 708

    Sandro Galea, a physician and an epidemiologist, is dean and Robert A. Knox Professor at Boston University School of Public Health. He previously held academic and leadership positions at Columbia University, the University of Michigan, and the New York Academy of Medicine. Galea’s scholarship has been at the intersection of social and psychiatric epidemiology, with a focus on the behavioral health consequences of trauma, including firearms. He has published more than 700 scientific journal articles, 50 chapters, and 13 books, and his research has been featured extensively in current periodicals and newspapers. His latest book, "Healthier: Fifty Thoughts on the Foundations of Population Health," was published by Oxford University Press in 2017. Galea holds a medical degree from the University of Toronto and graduate degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University. He also holds an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow. Galea was named one of "Time" magazine’s epidemiology innovators, and has been listed by Thomson Reuters as one of the “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds.” He is past president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research and an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Epidemiological Society. Galea has received several lifetime achievement awards for his research, including the Rema Lapouse Award from the American Public Health Association and the Robert S. Laufer, PhD, Memorial Award from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. He is a regular contributor to "Fortune" magazine and has published widely in the lay press, including the "Wall Street Journal," "Harvard Business Review," the "Boston Globe," and "The New York Times." His research has been cited by these publications as well as BBC, Slate, WBUR, and NPR, among others.

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