Psychosocial characteristics of primary care-seeking long-distance truck drivers in Kenya and associations with HIV testing.

Summary:

This study aimed to characterize a sample of 305 truck drivers recruited from 2 roadside wellness clinics in Kenya in terms of anticipated HIV stigma, self-efficacy, fatalism, gender equity, sensation seeking, and self-esteem, and then determine the association of these psychosocial characteristics with HIV testing behavior. Greater general self-efficacy was associated with higher income and more years working as a truck driver. Greater fatalism was associated with non-Christian religion, being married, and having a lower income. Greater gender equity was associated with completing high school, being married, and having higher income. Greater sensation seeking was associated with lower income and fewer years employed as a truck driver. The study concluded that associations with HIV testing behavior were not significant for self-efficacy, fatalism, gender equity, or sensation seeking. Public health interventions aiming to reduce anticipated stigma and increase self-esteem may potentially increase the uptake of HIV testing among truck drivers. Further research is needed to better understand the influence of these psycho-social characteristics on HIV testing.

Citation: Romo ML, George G, Mantell JE, Mwai E, Nyaga E, Odhiambo JO, Govender K, Kelvin EA. Psychosocial characteristics of primary care-seeking long-distance truck drivers in Kenya and associations with HIV testing. Afr J AIDS Res. 2018 Apr 24:1-9. doi: 10.2989/16085906.2018.1449760. [Epub ahead of print] Link to Article>>